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Cheap Seats: Caryn Lubetsky World Record Runner

South Floridian Caryn Lubetsky is truly an incredible woman and athlete. She’s a Guinness World Record Holder, Ultra Marathon Runner and Endurance Athlete who’s competed in several 100 mile ultra-marathons. And if that’s not impressive enough, she runs on behalf of The Childhood Cancer Project.

"About four years ago when my dear friend Joanna's son was diagnosed with Osteosarcoma and I saw what her family was going through I felt helpless. I knew that there had to be something I could do, I had this idea that maybe I could combine my passion for running with my intolerance with what was going on in our country with how we were treating children who were diagnosed with cancer," said Lubetsky.

Caryn is about to run a 100-mile race through the Florida Keys, as part of the famous “Keys 100” on May 18 - May 19, with the goal of raising $1,000 per mile for The Childhood Cancer Project. 1,000 per mile times 100 miles, equals 100,000 dollars.

"Our goal is to raise $100,000. These children, these families need us," said Lubetsky.

While, running 100 miles sounds impossible, for the most of us, Caryn pushes through. In part, because she knows she's running for those kids.

"100 miles is hard, I'm not saying that it's not hard, and it hurts that's for sure. Especially, mile 60 to 80 is the hardest because you've now been running now for about 9 to 10 hours and you still have a left. Once you get to 90, you're home free. So it's hard, but it's nothing compared to what these children go through each and every day. I make the choice to run; they didn't choose cancer, cancer chose them," said Lubetsky.

If you're thinking of donating to the Childhood Cancer Project, Caryn wants you to know its money very well spent.

"One of the most shocking things to me, was knowing that children who are diagnosed with Osteosarcoma today are receiving the same therapies that children who were diagnosed 40 years ago. You won't drive a car that's 40-years old, you couldn't even find a phone that was made 40-years ago. So how is it possible that we're accepting that children are receiving therapies that haven't been updated in 40 years. This is a call to action," said Lubetsky.

In effort to fight childhood cancer, visit 100keystothecure.org

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